Its beginning to look like a boat again.

So a little more spare time this week. I decided now was good enough to put the top half of the boat back on. Firstly I had to prep it by grinding away all the old material/wood on it. What I didn’t realise is Fletcher used quite a thick layer of built up fibreglass that all came off really easily and left me with a bit of a gap between the inner skin and the transom face. I’ll come onto that shortly however. I don’t have any pics of this, its not that interesting and very very messy.

Next was to replace the wood around the edge of the boat that had to be drilled to remove the top half.
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Then of course the holes could also be filled.
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After this had set the following day I was able to lift on the top half and see how it sat in place. After I was happy with that I secured it in place with wooden battens and screws. I also had to put a strap across the hull to pull it in a little to line it all up.

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Thankfully it sat now just as it did before.
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So with it now held in place I climbed aboard and glassed the two sections back together. This wasn’t too bad really. as well as joining the edges back into one section, I also glassed around the lower part of the engine well where it meets the transom. The reason for this was to enable me to fill the gap between the inner skin and transom without it just landing in the bottom of the hull. It also made the held everything in place really nicely.

So the next tricky bit was to fill in the gap in the transom to inner skin. This varied in thickness of around 4-8mm, and was previously filled with CSM and some kind of resin. I decided to do something essentially the same and used CSM fibreglass filler compound. I mixed it up into batches and then using a piece of wood started to force the material into the transom working from the bottom up ensuring to the best of my ability that I had not left any air pockets out. It seemed to work fine as I had the filler coming out of all the small holes in the transom.

So the end result was this:
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After it had all hardened I could then chop the transom. I measured the height and the old height was fine, so I just went off that.
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One strong transom…
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So after I had done this I gave everything a good clean down. This is now were I’m going to begin to prepare for the cosmetic finishing. I need to seal the top of the transom off but thats not a big job.
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Oh I should also say I’m going to paint this, not gel coat it. Paint for a boat that sits more out of water is fine, and its so much easier to repair, so earlier this week I went to the local automotive paint shop and found as close a match of paint as I could. What is surprising is how much the boats finish does actually vary. With that in mind I did a test. In this next pic is a paint test, in the middle of the picture is an area that has been brush painted for now just to see what the colour is like.
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And also in the middle of this one:
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So I didn’t think that is too bad. As you can see there are now holes etc that need repairing but all being well i can prepare this over the next few days and then all that just remains of this part of the project is filling sanding and painting.

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